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MA English Language Teaching

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  • Objectives
    This programme aims To attract an international cross-section of professional teachers of English as a second/foreign language with minimum two years' experience (as teacher, or materials writer etc.) and a first degree To deliver vocationally relevant training for the teacher who intends to return to the classroom with enhanced qualifications To deliver ESRC-accredited research training for the teacher who wishes to progress to a PhD on English Language Teaching or language learning/use by non-native learners to enable takers to: Gain a systematic understanding of recent theory, research findings and issues in language teaching, applied linguistics, second language acquisition, and related fields Evaluate the above critically and relate them to practical concerns of English teachers, especially in relation to their own professional teaching experience Understand and gain practical expertise in the key research methods of the field Develop and exploit a range of key thinking, working, communication and computer skills both ELT-related and generic.
  • Entry requirements
    Entry Qualifications A good BA honours (or equivalent) degree (2:1 or above). For non-native speakers of English, an IELTS score of 6.5, or a TOEFL score of 580 (computer based 230). Candidates are expected to have a minimum of two years' experience (as teacher of English as a second or foreign language, or materials writer etc.) Some prior knowledge of Linguistics is useful but not essential.
  • Academic Title
    MA English Language Teaching
  • Course description

    Course Description
    The MA in English Language Teaching is designed to enable experienced teachers of English as a second or foreign language to develop and update their knowledge of relevant ideas and research. It is offered jointly by the Department of Language and Linguistics and the International Academy.

    Modules and Options

    The lists of modules below represent the range of options available for each year of study. This may not be a complete list of the options you will study, and may be subject to change, so please contact the department for further details.

    Stage 1

        ACQUISITION OF SECOND LANGUAGE PHONOLOGY
        APPROACHES TO SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
        BLACK ENGLISHES
        CHILDREN'S ENGLISH
        COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE TESTING
        Compulsory: ASSIGNMENT WRITING AND DISSERTATION PREPARATION
        Compulsory: ELT PROFESSIONAL CONCERNS
        Compulsory: FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS
        Compulsory: LANGUAGE LEARNERS IN CLASSROOMS
        COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS I
        COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS II
        COMPUTER ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING: THEORY, RESEARCH AND PRACTICE
        CONSTRAINT BASED PHONOLOGY
        CONVERSATION AND SOCIAL INTERACTION
        Core: DISSERTATION: MA
        CORPORA IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING
        CULTURE IN SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TEACHING
        DESCRIPTIVE SYNTAX
        DESIGN OF LANGUAGE TEACHING PROGRAMMES AND MATERIALS FOR YOUNG LEARNERS
        DEVELOPMENT OF LANGUAGE PROCESSING
        DEVELOPMENTAL LANGUAGE DISORDERS
        DEVELOPMENTAL SECOND LANGUAGE SYNTAX
        DISCOURSE AND LANGUAGE TEACHING
        ENGLISH PHONOLOGY
        ENGLISH SYNTAX
        EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
        FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING
        FOUNDATIONS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES
        FOUNDATIONS OF INTERCULTURAL AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
        FOUNDATIONS OF LINGUISTICS
        FURTHER QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS IN LANGUAGE STUDY
        GENRE ANALYSIS, ACADEMIC ENGLISH FOR ESP
        GRADUATE RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT
        GRAMMATICAL DEVELOPMENT IN FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD LANGUAGE LEARNERS
        INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN L2 LEARNING
        INPUT IN LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TEACHING
        INTERCULTURAL PRAGMATICS
        INTRODUCTION TO HEAD-DRIVEN PHRASE STRUCTURE GRAMMAR
        INTRODUCTION TO LEXICAL FUNCTIONAL GRAMMAR
        INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING YOUNG LEARNERS
        INVESTIGATION INTO THE YOUNG LEARNERS CLASSROOM
        LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND THE CRITICAL PERIOD
        LANGUAGE AND GENDER
        LANGUAGE DISORDERS IN ADULTS
        LANGUAGE PROGRAMME EVALUATION
        LANGUAGE TEACHER EDUCATION
        LANGUAGE TEACHERS IN CLASSROOMS
        LANGUAGE TEACHING
        LANGUAGE TESTING
        LEARNER AUTONOMY
        LEARNER PERSPECTIVES ON VOCABULARY
        LEARNER STRATEGIES AND METALINGUISTIC KNOWLEDGE: EXPLICIT ASPECTS OF L2 LEARNING
        LEXICAL CHANGE IN THE HISTORY OF ENGLISH
        LITERACY DEVELOPMENT AND TEACHING OF READING TO YOUNG LEARNERS
        MATERIALS DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
        MATERIALS EVALUATION
        MINIMALISM SYNTAX II
        MINIMALIST SYNTAX I
        MORPHOLOGY
        MULTILINGUALISM
        NON-EXPERIMENTAL QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING
        PEDAGOGICAL GRAMMAR
        PHILOSOPHY OF LINGUISTICS
        PHONOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT AND PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS
        PHONOLOGICAL THEORY AND SECOND LANGUAGE PHONOLOGY
        PIDGIN AND CREOLE LANGUAGES
        PRAGMATICS: DISCOURSE AND RHETORIC
        PROLOG I
        PROLOG II
        QUALITATIVE METHODOLOGY IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING/APPLIED LINGUISITICS RESEARCH
        RELEVANCE THEORY
        RESEARCH TOPICS IN ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES
        RESEARCHING WRITING IN EFL/ESL
        SEMANTICS
        SENTENCE PROCESSING
        SOCIOLINGUISTIC METHODS I
        SOCIOLINGUISTIC METHODS II
        SOCIOLINGUISTICS I
        SOCIOLINGUISTICS II
        SOCIOPHONOLOGY
        SOCIOPHONOLOGY RESEARCH
        SYLLABUS DESIGN
        TEACHING ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES
        TEACHING ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES
        TEACHING PRACTICE I
        TEACHING PRACTICE II
        TEACHING WRITING IN EFL/ESL
        TEACHING, LISTENING AND SPEAKING
        THE MENTAL LEXICON
        THEORETICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE PHONOLOGY
        TOPICS IN HEAD-DRIVEN PHRASE STRUCTURE GRAMMAR
        TOPICS IN LEXICAL FUNCITIONAL GRAMMAR
        TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
        VARIATION IN ARABIC 1
        VARIATION IN ARABIC II
        VARIATION IN ENGLISH I
        VARIATION IN ENGLISH II
        VERB MEANING AND SENTENCE STRUCTURE

    Teaching and Assessment Methods
     
    A: Knowledge and Understanding
        Learning Outcomes
        A1 : familiarity with approaches to the study of language adopted in contemporary work in Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Psycholinguistics
        A2 : knowledge of key concepts, ideas, theories, styles of argumentation and evaluation criteria used in contemporary research in English Language and Linguistics, and an understanding of associated methodological, theoretical and descriptive issues
        A3 : A broad acquaintance with current concepts and theories related to English language teaching and learning, and learner behaviour and language use in fields such as ELT, Applied Linguistics, SLA, Testing, Education, Socio- and Psycholinguistics
        A4 : An in depth knowledge of the theories, issues and research findings and teacher implications thereof in at least four specialist areas within the domain of English language teaching and language learning and use by non-native speakers, or relevant specialist areas of linguistics more generally (The exact range of options available varies from year to year but typically includes: syllabus design, materials evaluation, teaching ESP, teaching young learners, the teaching of specific skills and areas of language, learners in classrooms, language testing and evaluation).
        A5 : An understanding of how the above apply to particular teaching situations, especially those that the taker is familiar with, in the context of accepted contemporary professional practice.

        Teaching Methods
        1-5 are taught initially through staff-led modules, using a variety of means of delivery (formal lecture, seminar, question-answer discussion session, group-work task-based session, computer lab session, student oral reports, workshop). Staff feedback to students on coursework is a connected important feature enhancing learning.Learning is expected to be deepened through directed and independent self-access library study and use of web material both put up by staff and generally available on the internet. Later, the dissertation research deepens understanding of 1-5 via a real integrated project supported by staff supervision and group tutorials.At any time support is available in the form of advice from staff in their consulting hours, and staff replies to student email queries.

        Assessment Methods
        Initially 1-4 are assessed through a 3000 word written assignment for each module, either of the essay type (e.g. literature review, or argumentative) or practical exercises. 5 is assessed with an oral presentation. 1-5 are also assessed later in an integrative way when the learner has to draw on this knowledge selectively for the dissertation.

    B: Intellectual/Cognitive Skills
        Learning Outcomes
        B1 : Critical skills needed to evaluate disparate sources of information, both academic (e.g. lectures, books) and experiential, and collate, select, and apply the information to a specific teaching issue or situation
        B2 : Ability to reflect independently on own teaching experience and relate it to the ideas and research in the field
        B3 : Ability to identify a research question or hypothesis, choose appropriate research methods, and interpret own and others' data and see the implications for a hypothesis or question
        B4 : Ability to apply critical thinking to linguistic evidence

        Teaching Methods
        1-3 are fostered repeatedly by all the means of teaching/learning described in (A) above. 4 mainly by one taught module on Foundations of Language.

        Assessment Methods
        1-3 are assessed primarily via those modules whose 3000 word written assignment is of the literature review or argumentative type, the oral presentation, the research assignment (if chosen) and finally collectively in the dissertation research project. 4 is assessed mainly through exercises.

    C: Practical Skills
        Learning Outcomes
        C1 : Ability to seek and retrieve relevant information from a variety of sources (e.g. library, journals, WWW)
        C2 : Ability to communicate lucidly in speech and writing about teaching and learning issues and own experience, in appropriate style
        C3 : Basic practical skills in language analysis (e.g. syntactic, phonemic)
        C4 : Basic skills in conducting and reporting empirical research (e.g. use of data gathering instruments like observation, tests or questionnaires, simple data analysis)
        C5 : Ability to propose, plan, execute and write up an original, complete but limited ELT-related study with due treatment of appropriate prior research and theory, generation of research aims, application of relevant methods (e.g. empirical data gathering, or syllabus/materials design or evaluation) and management and presentation of the whole project with due attention to proper professional practice and ethics

        Teaching Methods
        1 is promoted by library staff guidance and by the IT induction course, as well as being guided by staff teaching particular modules, and giving advice 2 is promoted by the oral and written tasks associated with the taught modules, and feedback on them, and by guidance in course booklet 3 and 4 have modules dedicated to them with practical tasks 5 is promoted by supervision of the research assignment (if chosen) and the obligatory dissertation 1-5 are further supported by advice from staff in consultation hours or by email, and by web-based self-access material.

        Assessment Methods
        1 and 2 are assessed indirectly via the written or oral assessments for the taught modules generally 3 and 4 are assessed specifically in the modules dedicated to them, by exercises and essay 5 is assessed primarily via the dissertation, along with 1-4 again.

    D: Key Skills
        Learning Outcomes
        D1 : a. Oral class presentation b. Oral participation in group discussion c. Academic writing, both in the form of argumentative academic papers and research reports, in appropriate style d. Critical reading: researching and utilising information, including scanning, recognising opinion and bias, detecting relevant points, collating different sources.
        D2 : Using advanced computational tools and software packages to obtain, store and process information stored in electronic form (e.g. from the Library, WWW or CD-rom), and (where appropriate) to analyse data and results
        D3 : a. Use of simple descriptive and inferential statistics b. Making and interpreting graphs and tables
        D4 : a. Analysis of tasks and identification of objectives b. Identification and use of relevant information sources c. Establishing main features of a complex problem d. Planning and selection of approach to reach a solution
        D5 : Participation in pair/group class tasks (including organising and evaluating own and others' contributions)
        D6 : a. Use of independent time management skills, initiative, and different approaches to working autonomously to meet assignment and dissertation targets b. Use of feedback and support from peers, lecturers and supervisor to meet targets and improve over the year

        Teaching Methods
        1 and 5 are promoted by many taught modules, and involves listening and notetaking in lectures. They are also facilitated by feedback. 2 is promoted mainly by the practical tasks of the IT induction course, and specific modules which introduce SPSS or other specialist software through practical tasks, as well as self access material on WWW. Students will be expected to become familiar with basic PC management and the word processing of academic documents. In their research for assignments and towards their dissertations students will gain familiarity with internet searching and electronic library and bibliographical databases. They may require skills in specific software packages (eg for Phonetic, corpus or qualitative analysis.) 3 is promoted specifically by several modules dealing with research methods 4 and 6 are promoted via the assignments and dissertation which impose requirements for students to apply these skills 1-6 are all further practised for the dissertation, and aided when necessary by staff advice by email or consultation.

        Assessment Methods
        1-6 are assessed integratively with other skills/knowledge in the module assessed work and the dissertation, apart from 2e which has targeted hand-in tasks. LG530 specifically assesses class presentations.

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