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European Legal Studies (LLM)

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  • Objectives
    To offer knowledge and expertise relating to the study of law in an international, European and/or comparative context.
  • Entry requirements
    Entry Requirements:

    This course is suitable for graduates from any legal tradition or jurisdiction or with a legal practice qualification from any legal tradition or jurisdiction. Applicants should usually have a good Honours degree in law, although applicants with other appropriate qualifications will be considered.

    Students without Law degrees will be offered a short introductory course prior to the commencement of the LLM programme itself.

    Students whose first language is not English must obtain a score of at least 6.5 in IELTS (with no less than 6.0 in any element) or 580 (paper-based), 237 (computer-based), 90 (internet-based) in TOEFL or equivalent. Students with English as a first language must have a GCSE/O Level of Grade C or above, and must provide a certificate of proof.
  • Academic Title
    European Legal Studies (LLM)
  • Course description
    Course Description:

    The LLM (European Legal Studies) offers students an opportunity to develop their own perspectives on the implications of legal Europe. It enables students to explore the issues and participate in debate, while developing their own legal skills and understanding. In addition it provides valuable training for a career in modern legal practice, in European, international and Government organisations, or in legal research.

    Students must complete four modules (one assessment for each module comprising of a 6,500 word essay or examination) and a dissertation (not exceeding 15,000 words). It may be possible to undertake two modules from the Masters of Laws (LLM) route.

    Depending on the route and the particular module, these comprise a mix of lectures and seminars, individual and joint written and oral presentations and distance learning. All modules are supported by extensive IT provision available on and off campus. Modules are typically led by staff actively engaged in research relevant to their subject matter.

    LLM European Legal Studies
    Introduction

    One of the key legal research questions in recent years has been that of ‘Europe’. Most obviously, there has been the need to think through the legal consequences of greater integration. Thus the legal forms of integration within the European Union, its impact on legal practice and its implications for legal theory have long been a focus of research, in addition to the growing influence of the European Convention on Human Rights. However, legal scholars have increasingly recognised the importance of understanding the diversity of legal cultures and traditions within Europe if we are to adequately assess both the desirability of, and constraints upon, further ‘Europeanisation’. As a result, there is a developing body of comparative legal research exploring differences in the approach to law and legal regulation across Europe. Sometimes there is an explicit policy interest in learning from others, but very often the desire is to understand better one’s own assumptions about law by looking at other legal cultures.

    The above issues are the focus of a rich variety of research work at Cardiff Law School. Many of our staff members have studied, taught and researched in different jurisdictions in Europe, for example in Ireland, France, Germany, Italy, Cyprus, Finland and the Czech Republic, as well as the various component nations of the United Kingdom. Studies include analysis of the transitions in legal culture in Central Europe post 1989, the relationships between European constitutions and identities, comparisons of youth justice cultures in Italy and Wales, analysis of social rights and corporate responsibilities in the EU and the legal construction of ethical foreign policy for the EU.

    The LLM in European Legal Studies offers students an opportunity to develop their own perspectives on the implications of legal Europe. It enables students to explore the issues and participate in debate, while developing their own legal skills and understanding. In addition, the LLM in European Legal Studies provides valuable training for a career in modern legal practice, in European, international and Government organisations, or in legal research.

    Students are encouraged to work independently to seek out legal materials, read and analyse them critically and present structured and reasoned argument, under the guidance of their tutors and supervisors. Teaching is mainly through seminars in which students are expected to give presentations and contribute actively to class discussion.
    Course structure

    The LLM in European Legal Studies is a one-year full-time programme comprising two parts:

        * Part 1 takes place over the course of semesters one and two (September to May). Students choose four 30 credit modules from the list of modules available in their year of study. Each module consists of a course of seminars supported by lectures. In addition to the four modules, students are required to attend introductory seminars and workshops on the nature of comparative legal study, on European legal cultures and the use of information technology and library search skills.

    If students pass Part 1, they may proceed to:

        * Part 2 (the dissertation stage). This provides students with an opportunity to research a legal topic of particular interest to them, thereby developing their capacity for research, analysis and structured and reasoned argument.. The choice of topic is subject to the title and proposal being considered viable, relevant to the programme and the availability of appropriate supervision. Students working on dissertations are required to consult their supervisor at scheduled supervision meetings.

    Diploma

    Students who pass Part 1, but do not complete the dissertation satisfactorily, are eligible for the award of a Diploma.

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