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Counselling Psychology Certificate

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  • Entry requirements
    Prospective candidates should normally hold a degree, with preferably some relevant experience or a recognised professional qualification.
  • Academic Title
    Counselling Psychology Certificate
  • Course description
    This one year, part-time programme is designed for (a) graduates who have little or no professional experience but wish to extend their knowledge of interpersonal and counselling skills prior to undertaking more advanced training in psychology; and (b) healthcare professionals, teachers, social workers, managers and others who wish to increase their interpersonal and counselling skills and apply them within their professional practice.

    Students undertake four taught modules that explore the relationship between counselling and psychology. Experimental learning and skills practice are central to this programme. These modules are undertaken on one day per week over the autumn and spring terms. The summer term is used for tutorials and project work.

    Duration

    The programme is offered on a part-time basis
     
    Students are required to attend the University for one year. Lectures, take place on Wednesdays between 10am to 5pm during term 1 and term 2. Students take six modules overall, four taught modules and two non-taught modules.

    Teaching and learning


    Modules are taught using a variety of methods, including lectures, role playing and small group projects. In addition, each student is allocated a member of the course team to be their personal tutor, who will help with any problems or queries that arise throughout the programme.
     
    Discussions in classes are intended to complement both the lectures and private reading, helping the student through argument and problem solving with other students.
     
    For students wishing to complement their studies with practical experience, we offer guidance on seeking voluntary placements. There are often opportunities to get involved in work with members of staff.
     
    Assessment

    To be awarded the Graduate Certificate qualification, students must successfully complete one piece of coursework for each of the 6 modules.  These include written assignments, a reflective diary, project work and class-based role-plays and presentations.

    Structure

    The programme runs on a part-time basis, one day a week (Wednesday) for one academic year. It consists of six modules, four of which are taught modules.  The other two are a project and personal and professional development. Two of the taught modules are undertaken in the first ten weeks of Teaching Period 1 and the other two in the first ten weeks of Teaching Period 2.  Students are expected to use Teaching Period weeks where no teaching takes place for practical experience, seminars, tutorials and project work.

    Module Outlines:
    PS3501 UNDERSTANDING MENTAL HEALTH (15 credits)

    Rationale
    This module provides important theory and evidence in relation to a key area of knowledge.

    Educational Aims
    To introduce students to the major approaches in counselling psychology.

    Learning Outcomes

        *
          Understand a range of mental health problems with which clients may present.
        *
          Know and understand the ways in which counselling skills may be applied to various mental health problems.
        *
          Critically discuss theories of a range of mental health presenting problems and the application of counselling skills to them.
        *
          Integrate an understanding of a range of mental health presenting problems with the practice of counselling skills and techniques.
        *
          Identify a range of mental health problems and related psychological theories.
        *
          Develop an appropriate attitude to the different mental health presentations of clients and an appreciation of the way in which these problems may affect the counselling process.

    Module Content

        *
          Theoretical models of mental health problems.
        *
          Techniques for working with a range of clients.
        *
          Ethical and professional issues

    Recommended Reading

        * American Psychological Association (1994). Publication Manual.  (4th Ed).  Washington D.C.: APA
        * Axline, V. M. (1964). Dibs: In Search of Self. London: Penguin Books.
          Carr, A. (1999). The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology. London: Routledge.
        * David L. Rosenhan, "On Being Sane in Insane Places," Science, Vol. 179 (Jan. 1973), 250-258
        * Egan, G. (1986). The Skilled Helper: A Systematic Approach to Effective Helping. Monterey, California: Brookes/Cole.
        * Geldard, K and Geldard, D. (2001). Counselling Children: A Practical Introduction. London: Sage.
        * Hawton, K., Salkovskis, P.M., Kirk, J. and Clark, D.M. (1989). Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Psychiatric Problems. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
        * Frankland, A and Sanders P. (1996). First Steps in Counselling. Manchester: PCCS Books.
        * Frankland, A and Sanders P. (1996). Next Steps in Counselling. Manchester: PCCS Books.
        * Kennedy, E. and Charles, S. C. (1990). On Becoming A Counsellor: A Basic Guide for Non-Professional Counsellors. Dublin: Newleaf.
        * Lindsay, S. and Powell, G. (eds). (1987). A Handbook of Clinical Adult Psychology. London: Gower.
        * Milgrom J, Martin P R & Negri L M (1999).  Treating Postnatal Depression:  A Psychological Approach for Health Care Practitioners.  Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
        * Szasz, Thomas S (1974).  The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct (Revised Edition). London: Harper and Row.

    PS3502 COUNSELLING SKILLS IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY (15 credits)

    Rationale
    This module provides a basis for the development and understanding of key skills in counselling.

    Educational Aims
    To provide students with the opportunity to learn about the interpersonal and therapeutic skills that are the foundation of the counselling process, and to provide an introduction to a range of theoretical frameworks, linking psychological theory and counselling technique.

    Learning Outcomes

        *
          A knowledge of psychological theoretical frameworks and their application to counselling techniques.
        *
          An understanding of the various structural elements required for the process of managing the therapeutic relationship within the counselling session.
        *
          To be able to integrate theory with practice.
        *
          To be able to analyse different forms of interpersonal relationships.
        *
          To integrate an understanding of a range of theoretical frameworks with the practice of counselling techniques.
        *
          To be able to critically discuss the differences between the counselling relationship and other interpersonal relationships.
        *
          To have practised and learnt to use some of the basic counselling skills.
        *
          To be able to demonstrate the application of the core conditions necessary for the helping relationship.
        *
          To be able to identify the expression and development of their own thoughts and feelings and evaluate how these affect their interaction with others.
        *
          To develop personal and professional awareness.
          To be able to contribute to the development of a safe and constructive context in which
        *
          experiential learning can take place.
        *
          An appropriate attitude to the process of counselling and an appreciation of the ethics of practice.

    Module Content

        *
          Core conditions of the therapeutic relationship - empathy, positive regard and genuineness.
        *
          Basic counselling skills and techniques.
        *
          Personal and professional awareness.


    Recommended Reading

        *
          American Psychological Association (1994) Publication Manual 4th ed. APA.
        *
          Bor R, Gill S, Miller R & Parrott C (2004).  Doing Therapy Briefly.  Hampshire: Palgrave
          Macmillan
        *
          Corey, G. (1996).  Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy.  (5th Ed).
          New York. Brooks/Cole.
        *
          Crouch, A (1997). Inside Counselling: Becoming and Being a Professional Counsellor.
          London: Sage Publications
        *
          Cully, S. (1990).  Integrative Counselling Skills.  Counselling in Action series.
          London: Sage.
        *
          Egan, G (1986) The Skilled Helper: A Systematic Approach to Effective Helping.
          Monterey, California.
        *
          Frankland, A and Sanders, P. (1995). Next Steps in Counselling. Manchester. PCCS
          Books.
        *
          Howe, D (1993). On being a client: Understanding the process of counselling and
          psychotherapy.  London: Sage Publications
        *
          Kirchenbaum, H. and Henderson, V.L. (eds). The Carl Rogers Reader. London: Constable.
        *
          McLeod, J. (1993) Sanders, P. (1994). First Steps in Counselling. Manchester: PCCS
          Books. Open University Press, Buckingham.
        *
          Mearns, D and Thorne, B (1988) Person Centred Counselling in Action 2nd Ed. Sage:
          London.
        *
          Sanders, P. (1994). First Steps in Counselling. Manchester: PCCS Books
        *
          Trower, P, Casey, A and Dryden, W. (1988) Cognitive-Behavioural Counselling in Action. Sage: London.

    PS3503 COUNSELLING ACROSS THE LIFESPAN (15 credits)


    Rationale

    This module provides critical theories in counselling psychology across the lifespan

    Educational Aims

    To introduce students to those aspects of social and developmental psychology and stages of the life cycle relevant to counselling psychology.

    Learning Outcomes

        *
          Develop a knowledge of theories of cognitive and emotional development in childhood.
        *
          Develop a knowledge of theories of attachment, dependency, separation, loss, dying and bereavement.
        *
          Gain an understanding of the theories relating to the stages of the life-cycle, including adolescence, early, middle and late adulthood, and the process of ageing.
        *
          Critically discuss the issues that may arise at the various stages of the life-cycle and how an understanding of these might be applied to practice with clients.
        *
          Appreciate the relation of evidence to theory.
        *
          Assess the coherence of theoretical frameworks.
        *
          Demonstrate an application of an understanding of developmental theory and the lifespan stages within the helping relationship.
        *
          Critically discuss the impact of early relationships on the process of socialisation and development across the lifespan.
        *
          Apply an understanding of life cycle and developmental theory to their own development and to their relationships with others


    Module Content

        *
          Theories of cognitive and emotional development in childhood.
        *
          Theories of attachment, dependency, separation and loss.
        *
          The effect of parent-child relationships and parental deprivation.
        *
          The process of socialisation and the growth of early relationships.
        *
          The development of gender identity and sexuality.
        *
          Defining adolescence and middle and late adulthood.
        *
          The process of ageing, loss, dying and bereavement.

    Recommended Reading

        *
          Altman, N. Briggs, R. Frakel, J. Gensler, D & Pantone, P (2002) Relational Child Psychotherapy. New York. Other Press
        *
          Da La Sierra, L. R (Ed) (2004) Child Analysis Today. London. Karnac
        *
          Gerhardt, S (2004) Why Love Matters. How affection shapes a baby’s brain. Hove. Brunner – Routledge
        *
          Salkind, N. J (2004) An Introduction to Theories of Human Development. London. Sage
        *
          Sheridan, M. D 92001) From Birth to Five Years. Child Development Progress. London. Routledge
        *
          Lanyado, M. & Horne, A (2000) The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Psychoanalytic Approaches. London. Routledge
     
    PS3504 THEORETICAL MODELS IN COUNSELLING PSYCHOLOGY (15 credits)

    Rationale

    This module provides important theory and evidence in relation to a key area of knowledge.

    Educational Aims

    To introduce students to the major approaches in counselling psychology.

    Learning Outcomes

        *
          A knowledge and understanding of a range of theoretical approaches to counselling.
        *
          Contrast and compare a range of therapeutic approaches and critically discuss their implications for practice.
        *
          Evaluate theory in relation to evidence and practice.
        *
          Critically discuss the differences between the main theoretical approaches to counselling psychology.
        *
          Demonstrate an application of a range of approaches to counselling psychology within the helping relationship.
        *
          Apply an understanding of theoretical models of counselling psychology to their own psychological processes.

    Module Content

        *
          Theoretical models of counselling psychology including CBT, systemic, psychodynamic and person centred models.
        *
          The application of these theories to work with clients.
        *
          The fundamental concepts underlying a range of therapeutic approaches and their implications for practice.


    Recommended Reading

        *
          Beck, A. T. Rush, A. J, Shaw., B. F. & Emery, G (1979) Cognitive Behaviour modification: An integrative Approach. New York. Plenum Press
        *
          Carr, A (2000) Family Therapy, Concepts, Process and Practice. Chichester. John Wiley and Sons LTD
        *
          Clarkson, P (2002). The Transpersonal Relationship in Psychotherapy. London. Whurr
        *
          Clarkson, p (2000) Ethics. Working with Ethical and Moral Dilemmas in Psychotherapy. London. Whurr
        *
          Corey, G (1996) The Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy. Brooks
          Cole, New York.
        *
          Dattilio (Ed) (1998) Case Studies in Couple and Family Therapy. Systemic and
        *
          Cognitive perspectives. New York and London. The Guilford Press
        *
          Hughes, P (1999) Dynamic Psychotherapy explained. Oxon. Radcliffe Medical press LTD
        *
          Jacobs, M (1999) Psychodynamic Counselling in Action. London. Sage
        *
          Mearns, D (1994) Developing Person Centred Counselling. London. Sage
        *
          Mearns, D & Thorne, B (1998) Person Centred Counselling in Action. London. Sage
        *
          Mcloughlin, B (1996) Developing Psychodynamic Counselling. London. Sage
        *
          Norcross, J. C & Goldfried, M. R (2005) Handbook of Psychotherapy Integration.
          Oxford. Oxford University Press
        *
          Padesky, C. A (1995) Mind over Mood. New York and London. The Guilford Press
        *
          Padesky C, A & Greenberger, D (1995) Clinicians Guide to Mind over Mood. New York
          and London. The Guilford Press.
        *
          Rogers, C. R (1961) On becoming a person: A Therapists view of Psychotherapy. London. Constable
        *
          Rogers, C. R (1951) Client Centred Therapy. Boston. Houghton Mifflin
        *
          Rogers, C. R (1980) A way of being. Boston. Houghton Mifflin
        *
          Rothschild, B (2000) The body remembers. The Psychophysiology of Trauma and Trauma Treatment. New York and London. W. W. Norton and Co

    PS3505 PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (15 credits)

    Rationale
    A vital part of the Certificate programme is for students to develop a reflective and self-critical awareness of their academic and professional skill development. The tutorial module is designed to give students the opportunity to discuss academic and professional issues on a one-to-one basis, and to receive feedback on their progress. It is assessed as Pass/Fail only on the basis of tutorial reports.

    Educational Aims
    To enable students to consider their progress on the programme with a view to maximising their potential, and to consider future plans.

    Learning Outcomes
    Self-awareness of your developing skills and areas requiring further development.
    To be able to critically reflect on their progress and developing skills.
    To learn how to make effective use of discussions about their progress and future plans with their tutor.
    An appropriate attitude to the process of counselling and an appreciation of the ethics of practice

    Module Content

    Discussion and feedback of progress observed in class, including observation of group exercises and role play; discussion of future plans including plans for further training.

    Recommended Reading

        *
          Board, R 91998) Counselling for Toads. London. Routledge
        *
          Bor, R. and Watts, M. (1999) (Eds) The Trainee Handbook: a guide for counselling and psychotherapy trainees. Sage: London.
        *
          Cross, M. C and Papadopoulos, L (2001) Becoming a Therapist; A Manual for Personal and Professional Development. London. Routledge
        *
          Egan, G 91991) The Skilled Helper: A Systematic Approach to Effective Helping. New York. Brookes/Cole
        *
          Legg, C (1998) Psychology and the Reflective Counsellor. Leicester: BPS Books.
        *
          McLeod, J (1993) An Introduction to Counselling. London. Open university Press
        *
          Watzlawick, P., Weakland, J. & Fisch, R. (1974) Change: Principles of Problem Formation and Problem Resolution. New York: Norton.

    PS3506 PROJECT FOR GCCP (15 credits)

    Rationale

    As a conclusion to the programme, students are given the opportunity to develop a personal area of interest, and to demonstrate independent learning in the context of a project. This module is non-taught.

    Educational Aims

    To give students the opportunity to link the knowledge and skills acquired during the programme to an area of professional practice, an area of theoretical debate or a topic of current national or international interest, and to consolidate research skills.

    Learning Outcomes

        *
          Gain knowledge and understanding of a relevant area of your choice.
        *
          Understand research skills, including accessing appropriate sources of information.
        *
          Demonstrate the ability to critically appraise the literature on a topic of interest.
        *
          Demonstrate the ability to produce written work at an appropriate academic standard and to present arguments logically and effectively.

    Module Content

    Guidance from project supervisor and class discussion on appropriate area of study; execution of the project.

    Recommended Reading

        *
          Bor, R. and Watts, M. (1999) (Eds) The Trainee Handbook: a guide for counselling and psychotherapy trainees. Sage: London.

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